Movies

This Terrifying Movie Looks Like Stanley Kubrick Directed It, But It Is Entirely AI-Generated

This Terrifying Movie Looks Like Stanley Kubrick Directed It, But It Is Entirely AI-Generated
Image credit: Youtube/Aze Avora

How can a utopia movie be less than 3 minutes, deliver the right message, and still be made using AI?

AI these days allows regular people to make really cool and one-of-a-kind things. Some people dream up new situations for their beloved characters, giving them a cool twist. Others create something absolutely unique.

Picture a place where everything looks flawless, a utopia of sorts. But once you start looking closer, you figure out that this dreamy paradise comes at a cost — a cost that's more than just monetary.

This is the unsettling premise of Aze Avora's short film Capitol of Conformity, a dystopian narrative that's entirely AI-generated. Yes, the visuals, the animation, and even the voice-over are crafted by AI tools.

The film takes us to a futuristic city called The Capitol, where life is all about unending joy. Sounds dreamy, right? But hold on, there's a catch.

The city offers a range of attractions like a cosmic carnival that chooses thrills for you, a bistro where you can eat to your heart's content, and even automatons that serve as perfect companions.

There's also a "mood-on-the-go" device that lets you change your emotions with a swipe of your thumb.

But all these luxuries come at the price of your identity. Yes, the very core of who you are. The narrator tells us that if you accept the rules, you will be constantly watched. It’s just crazy how just with AI-generated animated pictures, the film manages to make you feel uncomfortable.

The film has garnered a bit of attention, with close to 4,000 views since its upload on August 29, 2023.

Some of those who watched the film find it hard to wrap their heads around the idea that something so emotionally resonant and visually stunning didn't require human hands. Well, to make things clear, the author wrote the script and probably edited the film, so it did require some human assistance.

The film also serves as a kind of warning. It's a bit unsettling yet relevant, making us think about the ethical dilemmas tied to technological advancements. The idea that a seemingly utopian society might ask for something as big as your identity makes us wonder where our own society is headed.

How can a utopia movie be less than 3 minutes, deliver the right message, and still be made using AI?

AI these days allows regular people to make really cool and one-of-a-kind things. Some people dream up new situations for their beloved characters, giving them a cool twist. Others create something absolutely unique.

Picture a place where everything looks flawless, a utopia of sorts. But once you start looking closer, you figure out that this dreamy paradise comes at a cost — a cost that's more than just monetary.

This is the unsettling premise of Aze Avora's short film Capitol of Conformity, a dystopian narrative that's entirely AI-generated. Yes, the visuals, the animation, and even the voice-over are crafted by AI tools.

The film takes us to a futuristic city called The Capitol, where life is all about unending joy. Sounds dreamy, right? But hold on, there's a catch.

The city offers a range of attractions like a cosmic carnival that chooses thrills for you, a bistro where you can eat to your heart's content, and even automatons that serve as perfect companions.

There's also a "mood-on-the-go" device that lets you change your emotions with a swipe of your thumb.

But all these luxuries come at the price of your identity. Yes, the very core of who you are. The narrator tells us that if you accept the rules, you will be constantly watched. It’s just crazy how just with AI-generated animated pictures, the film manages to make you feel uncomfortable.

The film has garnered a bit of attention, with close to 4,000 views since its upload on August 29, 2023.

Some of those who watched the film find it hard to wrap their heads around the idea that something so emotionally resonant and visually stunning didn't require human hands. Well, to make things clear, the author wrote the script and probably edited the film, so it did require some human assistance.

The film also serves as a kind of warning. It's a bit unsettling yet relevant, making us think about the ethical dilemmas tied to technological advancements. The idea that a seemingly utopian society might ask for something as big as your identity makes us wonder where our own society is headed.